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Bob Marley Awarded English Heritage Blue Plaque

Renowned Jamaican singer-songwriter joins the likes of Jimi Hendrix, John Lennon, George Frideric Handel and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

Black and white portrait of Bob Marley (1945–1981)

Jamaican singer-songwriter Bob Marley© Trinity Mirror/Mirrorpix/Alamy Stock Photo

The pioneering reggae musician and cultural icon Bob Marley (1945–1981), whose album Exodus was rated by Time magazine in 1999 as the most important of the twentieth century, has been honoured with an English Heritage blue plaque.

The plaque marks number 42 Oakley Street, the Chelsea house where Marley lived in 1977. It was while living here that he and the Wailers finished recording the afore-mentioned album, which featured some of his biggest hits, including ‘Jamming’, ‘Waiting in Vain’, ‘Three Little Birds’ and ‘One Love’. With this address as his Chelsea home, Marley said he regarded London “as a second base,” often playing football with his bandmates on the pitches at nearby Battersea Park.

Blue Plaques Panel member, David Olusoga, yesterday said:

“Bob Marley was the first superstar to emerge from the developing world. More than a brilliant musician, he became a cultural icon who blazed a trail for other black artists. 

“It’s wonderful to – finally –  be able honour him with a blue plaque here on Oakley Street today, after all the time and determination that went into proving that this was indeed Bob’s house. Thanks to new testimonies there is no longer any doubt.

“While the number of blue plaques to black and Asian figures from history is still unacceptably low, Bob Marley’s plaque is a testament to how our scheme is changing, as English Heritage continues to work to overcome the obstacles that have led to this underrepresentation.”

Click here for the full press release

 

Channel website: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/

Original article link: https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/about-us/search-news/bob-marley-blue-plaque/

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