Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC - formerly IPCC)
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IOPC launches first three year plan to improve public confidence in policing

The Independent Office for Police Conduct has made a clear commitment to improve public confidence in policing by ensuring the police are accountable for their actions and lessons are learned. Our three-year Strategic Plan published yesterday details the priorities for the new organisation which took over from its predecessor, the Independent Police Complaints Commission in January of this year.

Those priorities are:

  • to work with others to improve the police complaints system
  • to improve policing by identifying and sharing learning from our work
  • to improve confidence in police accountability
  • to be an efficient and effective organisation.

IOPC Director General Michael Lockwood yesterday said:

“At the heart of our strategy is a commitment to learning and continuous improvement. We will continue to hold police officers to account for poor conduct, but we also want to improve policing by identifying and sharing learning from our work. Equally important will be our efforts to continuously improve the police complaints system so that it delivers impartial, evidence-based and timely outcomes for all.

“Today we have detailed our ambitious plans that will change the focus of our organisation but we cannot provide system-wide improvements in isolation. I look forward to working more closely with communities, non-policing stakeholders and other organisations who are part of the wider police accountability framework including Police and Crime Commissioners and the police and fire service inspectorate in order to achieve the change we are striving for.”

 

Channel website: https://policeconduct.gov.uk/

Original article link: https://policeconduct.gov.uk/news/iopc-launches-first-three-year-plan-improve-public-confidence-policing

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