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Security Union report: Keeping up the momentum on implementation of key initiatives

Fulfilling a commitment to regularly report on progress in the area of security, the Commission yesterday presented a report, the first since the new EU Security Union Strategy 2020-2025 was presented in July.

The report highlights actions taken at EU level under the 4 main priorities: a future-proof security environment, tackling evolving threats, protecting Europeans from terrorism and organised crime, and a strong European security ecosystem. The report includes a wide range of reporting on security policy, such as skills and awareness raising issues or education, following the whole-of-society concept of the new strategy. Its core theme is implementation of agreed decisions, which requires continued political and operational efforts by EU institutions and national authorities.

Vice-President for Promoting our European Way of Life Margaritis Schinas yesterday said:

We have a strong set of security rules in place at EU level, built up over two decades, but they will do no one any good unless they are effectively and consistently implemented in practice. This is why this Commission committed to placing a relentless emphasis on implementation. Today we are calling on Member States to step up their work to ensure there are no gaps or delays in how we apply key security instruments such as EU rules on combating terrorism, firearms and on fighting money laundering and terrorist financing. Ensuring the security of EU citizens is a common responsibility where we all have to do our part.”

Commissioner for Home Affairs Ylva Johansson yesterday said:

“Internal security is at the core of the Security Union Strategy. Today, and in the coming weeks I will address the needs which have been identified. These include improving the EU response to terrorist content online, making IT systems work together and identifying, reporting and removing online child sex abuse materials.”

Key progress and actions needed

The report covers the period from October 2019 to December 2020 and details the significant progress made on priority legislative and other initiatives under the 4 strategic priorities and identifies areas where improvement is needed.

  • A future-proof security environment: This year, the Commission took strategic and technical measures to ensure the cybersecurity of 5G networks as well as to tackle cross-border health threats. However, there is still a need to further strengthen the protection and resilience of both physical and digital critical infrastructure from a wide range of threats, whether natural or man-made disasters or terrorist attacks. The Commission will shortly present proposals to this effect. Steps are also under way to address specific security needs because of the misuse of emerging technologies such as drones. The report also notes the first ever cyber sanctions imposed following cyber-attacks.
  • Tackling evolving threats: The Commission has taken action to tackle evolving threats to combat child sexual abuse, hybrid attacks and disinformation to ensure Member States have the right tools to fight and prosecute crime, in full respect of fundamental rights. The Commission calls on Member States to fully implement both the Directive on attacks against information systems and the Directive on combating child sexual abuse. In July, the Commission adopted the EU strategy for a more effective fight against child sexual abuse and subsequently proposed interim legislation to allow the continuation of voluntary detection efforts by online communications services beyond 21 December 2020 (when these providers will fall within the scope of the ePrivacy Directive). The Commission is working on a long-term solution, to be presented in 2021.
  • Protecting Europeans from terrorism and organised crime: the Commission is adopting a new EU Counter-Terrorism Agenda to strengthen the EU's framework to anticipate threats and risks, combat radicalisation and violent extremism, and protect people and infrastructures, notably public spaces. A proposal to revise the mandate for Europol, the EU's police cooperation agency, was also adopted yesterday, to strengthen Europol's work on fighting organised crime and terrorism.
  • A strong European security ecosystem relies on strong cooperation and information exchange and well controlled external borders. To achieve this, the key focus should be on implementation of agreed reforms, notably to achieve the interoperability of databases for migration management, border control and security.

The report also highlights the urgent need to conclude negotiations between the European Parliament and the Council on the proposed Terrorist Content Online Regulation and the work of the EU Internet Forum as an essential platform that brings together Member States and industry to prevent the spread of terrorist content online and counter radicalising messages.

Click here for the full press release

 

Original article link: https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/IP_20_2328

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