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Spending Review 2013: Statement from IfG

The Institute for Government's Deputy Director, Julian McCrae, said:

“There were few real surprises today as the Chancellor read out the departmental cuts from the Treasury spreadsheet. Of the unprotected departments, those which have been making the loudest political cases - Defence, Home Office and Business – did best.

“The public will have no better understanding today of what these cuts will mean in practice – but neither will Whitehall yet. The real work starts tomorrow for the Civil Service, creating detailed plans within these totals and also preparing for the further cuts that will inevitably come after the next election. We need to hear more from those charged with reforming Whitehall about how the civil service needs to change and the structure of departments, so the cuts can be made as efficiently as possible. The necessary reform will require political support from the highest level, and be carefully designed to keep Whitehall standing through the process.”  

- See more at: http://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/news/latest/spending-review-2013-statement-ifg#sthash.5O6g8jX0.dpuf

The Institute for Government's Deputy Director, Julian McCrae, said:

“There were few real surprises today as the Chancellor read out the departmental cuts from the Treasury spreadsheet. Of the unprotected departments, those which have been making the loudest political cases - Defence, Home Office and Business – did best.

“The public will have no better understanding today of what these cuts will mean in practice – but neither will Whitehall yet. The real work starts tomorrow for the Civil Service, creating detailed plans within these totals and also preparing for the further cuts that will inevitably come after the next election. We need to hear more from those charged with reforming Whitehall about how the civil service needs to change and the structure of departments, so the cuts can be made as efficiently as possible. The necessary reform will require political support from the highest level, and be carefully designed to keep Whitehall standing through the process.” 
- See more at:
http://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/news/latest/spending-review-2013-statement-ifg#sthash.5O6g8jX0.dpuf

The Institute for Government's Deputy Director, Julian McCrae, said:

“There were few real surprises today as the Chancellor read out the departmental cuts from the Treasury spreadsheet. Of the unprotected departments, those which have been making the loudest political cases - Defence, Home Office and Business – did best.

“The public will have no better understanding today of what these cuts will mean in practice – but neither will Whitehall yet. The real work starts tomorrow for the Civil Service, creating detailed plans within these totals and also preparing for the further cuts that will inevitably come after the next election. We need to hear more from those charged with reforming Whitehall about how the civil service needs to change and the structure of departments, so the cuts can be made as efficiently as possible. The necessary reform will require political support from the highest level, and be carefully designed to keep Whitehall standing through the process.”  

- See more at: http://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/news/latest/spending-review-2013-statement-ifg#sthash.5O6g8jX0.dpuf
There were few real surprises today as the Chancellor read out the departmental cuts from the Treasury spreadsheet. Of the unprotected departments, those which have been making the loudest political cases - Defence, Home Office and Business – did best. - See more at: http://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/news/latest/spending-review-2013-statement-ifg#sthash.5O6g8jX0.dpuf

The Institute for Government's Deputy Director, Julian McCrae, said:

“There were few real surprises today as the Chancellor read out the departmental cuts from the Treasury spreadsheet. Of the unprotected departments, those which have been making the loudest political cases - Defence, Home Office and Business – did best.

“The public will have no better understanding today of what these cuts will mean in practice – but neither will Whitehall yet. The real work starts tomorrow for the Civil Service, creating detailed plans within these totals and also preparing for the further cuts that will inevitably come after the next election. We need to hear more from those charged with reforming Whitehall about how the civil service needs to change and the structure of departments, so the cuts can be made as efficiently as possible. The necessary reform will require political support from the highest level, and be carefully designed to keep Whitehall standing through the process.”

- See more at: http://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/news/latest/spending-review-2013-statement-ifg#sthash.5O6g8jX0.dpuf
There were few real surprises today as the Chancellor read out the departmental cuts from the Treasury spreadsheet. Of the unprotected departments, those which have been making the loudest political cases - Defence, Home Office and Business – did best. - See more at: http://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/news/latest/spending-review-2013-statement-ifg#sthash.5O6g8jX0.dpuf

The Institute for Government's Deputy Director, Julian McCrae, said:

“There were few real surprises today as the Chancellor read out the departmental cuts from the Treasury spreadsheet. Of the unprotected departments, those which have been making the loudest political cases - Defence, Home Office and Business – did best.

“The public will have no better understanding today of what these cuts will mean in practice – but neither will Whitehall yet. The real work starts tomorrow for the Civil Service, creating detailed plans within these totals and also preparing for the further cuts that will inevitably come after the next election. We need to hear more from those charged with reforming Whitehall about how the civil service needs to change and the structure of departments, so the cuts can be made as efficiently as possible. The necessary reform will require political support from the highest level, and be carefully designed to keep Whitehall standing through the process.”

- See more at: http://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/news/latest/spending-review-2013-statement-ifg#sthash.5O6g8jX0.dpuf

The Institute for Government's Deputy Director, Julian McCrae, said:

“There were few real surprises today as the Chancellor read out the departmental cuts from the Treasury spreadsheet. Of the unprotected departments, those which have been making the loudest political cases - Defence, Home Office and Business – did best.

“The public will have no better understanding today of what these cuts will mean in practice – but neither will Whitehall yet. The real work starts tomorrow for the Civil Service, creating detailed plans within these totals and also preparing for the further cuts that will inevitably come after the next election. We need to hear more from those charged with reforming Whitehall about how the civil service needs to change and the structure of departments, so the cuts can be made as efficiently as possible. The necessary reform will require political support from the highest level, and be carefully designed to keep Whitehall standing through the process.”  

- See more at: http://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/news/latest/spending-review-2013-statement-ifg#sthash.5O6g8jX0.dpuf

The Institute for Government's Deputy Director, Julian McCrae, said:

“There were few real surprises today as the Chancellor read out the departmental cuts from the Treasury spreadsheet. Of the unprotected departments, those which have been making the loudest political cases - Defence, Home Office and Business – did best.

“The public will have no better understanding today of what these cuts will mean in practice – but neither will Whitehall yet. The real work starts tomorrow for the Civil Service, creating detailed plans within these totals and also preparing for the further cuts that will inevitably come after the next election. We need to hear more from those charged with reforming Whitehall about how the civil service needs to change and the structure of departments, so the cuts can be made as efficiently as possible. The necessary reform will require political support from the highest level, and be carefully designed to keep Whitehall standing through the process.”  

- See more at: http://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/news/latest/spending-review-2013-statement-ifg#sthash.5O6g8jX0.dpuf

The Institute for Government's Deputy Director, Julian McCrae, said:

“There were few real surprises today as the Chancellor read out the departmental cuts from the Treasury spreadsheet. Of the unprotected departments, those which have been making the loudest political cases - Defence, Home Office and Business – did best.

“The public will have no better understanding today of what these cuts will mean in practice – but neither will Whitehall yet. The real work starts tomorrow for the Civil Service, creating detailed plans within these totals and also preparing for the further cuts that will inevitably come after the next election. We need to hear more from those charged with reforming Whitehall about how the civil service needs to change and the structure of departments, so the cuts can be made as efficiently as possible. The necessary reform will require political support from the highest level, and be carefully designed to keep Whitehall standing through the process.”  

- See more at: http://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/news/latest/spending-review-2013-statement-ifg#sthash.5O6g8jX0.dpuf

The Institute for Government's Deputy Director, Julian McCrae, said:

“There were few real surprises today as the Chancellor read out the departmental cuts from the Treasury spreadsheet. Of the unprotected departments, those which have been making the loudest political cases - Defence, Home Office and Business – did best.

“The public will have no better understanding today of what these cuts will mean in practice – but neither will Whitehall yet. The real work starts tomorrow for the Civil Service, creating detailed plans within these totals and also preparing for the further cuts that will inevitably come after the next election. We need to hear more from those charged with reforming Whitehall about how the civil service needs to change and the structure of departments, so the cuts can be made as efficiently as possible. The necessary reform will require political support from the highest level, and be carefully designed to keep Whitehall standing through the process.”  

- See more at: http://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/news/latest/spending-review-2013-statement-ifg#sthash.5O6g8jX0.dpuf

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