Scottish Government
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Scottish Health Survey report on equality

Scotland’s Chief Statistician yesterday announced the publication of a Scottish Health Survey topic report on equality groups.

The report includes data on health behaviours and health characteristics broken down by the following equality groups: gender, age, ethnic group, religion, disability and sexual orientation. 

By combining survey data from four consecutive years (2008-2011), more in-depth analysis of minority groups with small populations is possible. This report represents an important step forward in the availability of data on equality groups in Scotland.

Main Findings: 

* Men had a more positive view of their general health and reported higher mental wellbeing than women.

* There was a strong association between disability, poor self-assessed health and low mental wellbeing.

* Hindus had the highest levels of self-assessed health and were the least likely to have a high GHQ-12 score.

* People who belonged to no religious group were most likely to drink excessively whilst Muslims, Hindus and Buddhists were the least likely religious groups to drink at hazardous or harmful levels.

* Respondents who identified themselves as lesbian or gay were significantly more likely to drink at hazardous or harmful levels than the national average.

* Prevalence of smoking was highest among 25-34 year olds and decreased with age but 45-54 year old smokers smoked the most cigarettes per day.

* Respondents who reported a disability were significantly more likely to smoke than those who did not.

* White British respondents were least likely to eat five portions of fruit and vegetables a day whilst respondents from White Other, Pakistani, Chinese, Asian Other and Other ethnic groups all had significantly higher consumption than the national average.

* Men participated more in sport and were more likely to meet the physical activity recommendations than women.

* Muslims had low levels of sport and physical activity whilst those with no religious faith were the most likely to meet the physical activity recommendations.

* Disabled people were less likely to participate in physical activity and sport.

* Buddhists and Hindus had low levels of obesity whilst Church of Scotland members had significantly higher levels than the national average.

* Prevalence of CVD and diabetes increased with age.

* Chinese people had the lowest prevalence of CVD whilst diabetes prevalence was highest among Pakistani and Indian ethnic groups.

* Respondents who identified themselves as lesbian or gay were significantly less likely to have diabetes than the national average.

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