Scottish Government
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Fine collection progress report

The Scottish Court Service has published the latest quarterly fines collection figures.

This is the second in a series of quarterly fines reports. The first was published on October 23 reporting on fines imposed until the end of March 2009. This report is for fines imposed until the end of June 2009.

Eric McQueen, Director of Field Services said:

"This latest report brings fines information up to date and into a regular quarterly reporting cycle.

"The report shows that we continue to make good progress on fines collection and highlights the substantial increase in direct enforcement actions taken by SCS in recent months, particularly deductions from benefits.

"We introduced new enforcement measures in July and as this report shows over 4000 benefit deduction orders were granted in the last three months as well as over 400 earnings arrestment orders. We are starting to see this feed through to payment levels with a 5 per cent increase in fiscal fines being fully paid over this period and overall court imposed fine payment at the highest ever rate of 88%.

"The enforcement actions are working and we will continue to increase their use.

This is reinforcing the message that fines must be paid, there is no place for fines dodgers to hide. SCS will use all enforcement sanctions to ensure that fines are paid, include seizing wages, arresting bank accounts or deducting payments from benefits.

In July 2009 the Scottish Court Service announced new measures to improve the efficiency of fines collection including:

  • New tracing facilities to speed up enforcement action giving access to information on known aliases, employment history, bank accounts and credit cards
  • Using Sheriff Officers to target persistent defaulters who are ignoring payment demands
  • Working closely with the Department of Work and Pensions to speed up benefit deductions, so that offenders cannot avoid their penalty

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