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Contacting your communications provider

While many customers enjoy a trouble-free broadband or telephone experience, there may be occasions when you have to get in touch with your communications provider.

Maybe you need to report a problem, lodge a complaint or start the process to switch away to another supplier.

Ofcom has put together a series of template letters which you can download and use when you need to contact your provider.

For example, if you want to transfer to another mobile phone provider – and you want to take your existing number with you – you need to ask your existing provider for a Porting Authorisation Code or PAC.

PAC and MAC

To do this you can use our PAC request template letter. Once you have the PAC, tell your new mobile phone company that you want to keep your existing mobile number and give them the PAC.

Similarly, when you want to switch broadband providers you need a Migration Authorisation Code or MAC.

A MAC is a unique code which identifies a particular line and enables customers to switch ISPs smoothly and with minimal disruption.

If you’ve decided to switch providers, send our MAC request letter to your existing ISP.

Once it has received your request it must provide the MAC to you within five working days and it’s valid for a period of 30 days.

Mobile coverage

We also have template letters you can use if you have experienced a loss of broadband connection or a loss of mobile coverage.

There are letters if you have to contact your communications provider about a refund you haven’t received, or if you have experienced a partial loss of service.

Finally there are letter templates you can use to contact your communications provider about intermittent faults, ignored complaints and delays.

Click here to go to our letter template section.

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